Originally Posted By feedtheflies

Originally Posted By bookporn

criticalmassofbooks:

gailsimone:

jerk—alert:

bookporn:

The saddest post ever.

Dammit. Dammit all.

What a shame, what a waste.

(via funeralfungi)

Originally Posted By staceythinx

staceythinx:

Mary Edna Fraser uses the process of batik silk dying to tell the story of climate change in both pictures and process. You can find out more about the project here.

Originally Posted By fearandwar

To be recognized as a feminist is to be assigned to a difficult category and a category of difficulty. You are “already read” as “not easy to get along with” when you name yourself as a feminist. You have to show that you are not difficult through displaying signs of good will and happiness. Frye alludes to such experiences when she describes how: “this means, at the very least, that we may be found to be “difficult” or unpleasant to work with, which is enough to cost one’s livelihood.” We can also witness an investment in feminist unhappiness (the myth that feminists kill joy because they are joy-less). There is a desire to believe that women become feminists because they are unhappy. This desire functions as a defense of happiness against feminist critique. This is not to say that feminists might not be unhappy; becoming a feminist might mean becoming aware of just how much there is to be unhappy about. Feminist consciousness could be understood as consciousness of unhappiness, a consciousness made possible by the refusal to turn away. My point here would be that feminists are read as being unhappy, such that situations of conflict, violence, and power are read as about the unhappiness of feminists, rather than being what feminists are unhappy about.

Originally Posted By artandsciencejournal

artandsciencejournal:

Fragile Viruses

Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.

Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox

The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.

-Anna Paluch

Mmmm, virus…..

Originally Posted By funaria

My favorite people

My favorite people

(via deathofastylist)

Originally Posted By michelinafe

michelinafe:

Erykah Badu - Givenchy Spring 2014 A.D.

(via deathofastylist)

Originally Posted By supersonicart

supersonicart:

Zachari Logan.

Illustrations and paintings by Zachari Logan:

Read More

Zachari Logan

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